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Wedding Traditions
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In South Africa, to mark the start of the newly-weds life together, the bride's and groom's parents would traditionally carry a fire from their hearths in their homes to the home of the new couple, where a new fire would be lit.

In Scotland, the bride, when she leaves home for the last time as a single girl, should step out of the house with her right foot for luck. A “Penny Wedding,” is one where guests are expected to bring their own food and drinks to the church to celebrate the wedding.

In Scotland, a religious ceremony may be held at any time or place as long as the person conducting the ceremony is licensed.  This is opposed to English law which states that the building must be licensed and not the person.

Creeling the bridegroom was a Highlamd custom where a large basket or ‘creel’ was filled with stones and tied to the bridegroom’s back.  He then had to carry it around the entire town until his bride agreed to kiss him.

Wedding Traditions Around the World

Welsh brides used to give their attendants myrtle in their bouquets.  The myrtle would be planted and tradition held that if the plant grew, the grower would be married.

A man wishing to marry a girl would carve various symbols, such as keys, bells and hearts, into a wooden spoon (love spoon).

South Africa
Scotland
Wales
The twelve symbols of life important in African culture may be administered as part of the wedding ceremony.  These are wine, wheat, pepper, salt, bitter herbs, water, a pot and spoon, a broom, honey, a spear, a shield, and a copy of the Bible or the Koran.  Each one represents a different aspect of the love and strength which unites two families.  The wedding feast which follows the ceremony is traditionally known as the Karamu.
African Culture